Allergy and Asthma Treatment in Tempe, Chandler and Mesa, AZ. Phone 480-838-4296.

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A message from Dr Suresh Anand and Dr Miriam Anand with Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. Treating Phoenix area patients in Chandler, Tempe and Mesa. Phone 480-838-4296.

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Allergy Associates treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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FALL – 2016 Seasonal Allergen Forecast for Chandler, Mesa, Phoenix and Tempe, AZ. Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. Phone 480-838-4296.

ForecastSeasonalAllergen

Pollen.com considers FALL 2016 in Tempe, Chandler & Mesa, AZ to be 

September, October & November.

The plants listed below have been documented to grow in Arizona, and to flower during the season indicated nationally. Flowering time pertains to the particular season of the year that a species is most likely to occur within your area. Although the flowering period for any particular species may be fairly extensive, the pollination period itself (which may cause allergic symptoms to those sensitive) is generally much more abbreviated.

Trees

Weeds

Grasses

View the original Pollen.com SUMMER ALLERGEN article, click here.

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Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in

Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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Do you feel left out of holiday fun because of food allergies? Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. Treating Phoenix patients at offices in Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ. Phone 480-838-4296.

 CNNarticleheaderA

Do you feel left out of holiday fun because of food allergies? 

Previously posted on CNN.com.

Holidays are a particularly challenging time for us food-allergic individuals with so many desserts and homemade treats, casseroles and dips laid out on the table — largely without ingredient labels.

Food-allergic children can feel left out of the traditional festivities, many of which center around food, and allergies can present a challenge for hosts, as they frequently must tend to a wide range of preferences and needs behind the scenes.

All the excitement and good cheer makes it more difficult to be informed about the ingredients in each and every party food. There are ways, however, to reduce anxiety through the holidays while staying happy, healthy, and allergy free.

Season’s eatings

Protecting children with allergies holiday4

This is a wonderful time of year for getting together over meals with those closest to you. I suffer from fish allergy and my daughter has a peanut and tree nut allergy.

Members of our inner circle are the most reliable and trusted food allergy gatekeepers for parties and celebrations, but it’s not possible to assume that friends and family will always remember to avoid reaction-causing foods after you’ve told them. After all, they don’t live with your food allergy day in and day out and, thus, naturally aren’t yet in the habit of checking every label every time.

The holiday season is an optimal time to check in and remind everyone of your allergies prior to the get-togethers. This season is also an excellent time to ensure your auto-injectors and rescue medications are up-to-date. The auto-injectors, in particular, have a relatively short shelf life and the product visibly starts to deteriorate at or around the expiration date. Remaining vigilant is key.

Here are some holiday gathering tips for both hosts and guests:

For hosts 

Hang on to labels. Keep food labels for everything used to prepare a festive homemade holiday meal so an allergic guest holidayfood
may double-check the ingredient list.

Suggest alternatives. Request flowers, wine or holiday-themed napkins and plates if guests want to contribute to the party and someone with a food allergy is attending.

Look for “natural” turkey. Some pre-basted turkeys contain soy, wheat, and dairy. Instead, look for turkeys labeled “natural,” which by law must be minimally processed. Some free-range, all-natural, fresh turkeys are free of antibiotics, hormones, and allergens.

Avoid cross-contamination. Care with utensils and surfaces when preparing foods is a must. Rinsing a knife that chopped walnuts is insufficient — thoroughly scrub all utensils and surfaces with soap and water and wipe clean. Even trace amounts of a food can cause a reaction for highly allergic people.

Use color coding. How about trying color-coded cooking utensils this year? A bright red silicone spatula or a nifty lime green serving spoon is sure to alert food-allergic guests. Many large box stores stock seasonal arrays of themed and brightly colored utensils in advance of the holiday season.

Consider donating. If a guest brings a food item that contains allergens, and there’s an allergic diner at the table, you could accept the item if it’s well-sealed and donate it later to a friend or a soup kitchen. Some cities even have volunteer organizations dedicated to alleviating hunger. After a free phone call, their volunteers, who deliver sometimes more than 10 tons of food a week to agencies feeding people in need, will pick up your donation.

For guests

Put thought into contributions. When in doubt, beautiful fresh flowers are always a welcome hostess gift instead of a pie from a bakery when you’re just not sure about the allergy safety.

Ship ahead. If you’re allergic and flying to visit friends or family, make some simple allergy-free foods that travel well and ship them to your host’s home a week or more in advance, so you’re sure they’ll arrive in time for your visit.

Bring an allergy-free host gift. If your host has food allergies, you can always bring a gift of unpeeled fruit or a prepackaged seasonal safe food, with ingredient lists approved by your host.

Bring a safe dish. If you’re food allergic and even if the party you’re invited to is not a potluck, why not offer to bring a safe dish or two so there’s definitely something you can eat. Your host will be thankful not to have to prepare separate food items, and sharing dishes that are allergen-free will delight everyone there.

Check in beforehand. If you are allergic, always let your host or restaurant where you’re celebrating know in advance — don’t assume they will remember. Even a restaurant where you frequently dine may not immediately remember you and your medical condition at holiday banquet tables with prix-fixe meals. Be sure to remember to always carry your rescue medication just in case of emergency. And here’s to your good health.

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View the entire article at CNN.com, click here.

Happy holiday’s from Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd.!

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Happy Thanksgiving from Allergy Associates and Asthma. Allergy and Asthma treatment in Tempe, Chandler and Mesa. 480-838-4296 .

images3

One of the widely celebrated holidays in the United States, Thanksgiving as a day of giving thanks for the blessing of the harvest, has its history and origin way back to the ancient centuries. The day in the United States is a holiday on the fourth Thursday of November. Even though the style and grace of the celebration have changed a lot, but it still is one of the prime festivals in the United States.

Click here for Thanksgiving with Food Allergies.

Thanksgiving, or Thanksgiving Day, is a public holiday celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November in the United States. It originated as a harvest festival. Thanksgiving has been celebrated nationally on and off since 1789, after a proclamation by George Washington. It has been celebrated as a federal holiday every year since 1863, when, during the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national day of “Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens,” to be celebrated on the last Thursday in November. Together with Christmas and the New Year, Thanksgiving is a part of the broader holiday season.

The event that Americans commonly call the “First Thanksgiving” was celebrated by the Pilgrims after their first harvest in the New World in 1621. This feast lasted three days, and—as accounted by attendee Edward Winslow —it was attended by 90 Native Americans and 53 Pilgrims. The New England colonists were accustomed to regularly celebrating “thanksgivings”—days of prayer thanking God for blessings such as military victory or the end of a drought.

U.S. tradition compares the holiday with a meal held in 1621 by the Wampanoag and the Pilgrims who settled at Plymouth Plantation. It is continued in modern times with the Thanksgiving dinner, traditionally featuring turkey, playing a central role in the celebration of Thanksgiving.

In the United States, certain kinds of food are traditionally served at Thanksgiving meals. Turkey, usually roasted and stuffed (but sometimes deep-fried instead), is typically the featured item on any Thanksgiving feast table, so much so that Thanksgiving is colloquially known as “Turkey Day.” In fact, 45 million turkeys were consumed on Thanksgiving Day alone in 2015. With 85 percent of Americans partaking in the meal, that’s an estimated 276 million Americans dining on the festive poultry, spending an expected $1.05 billion on turkeys for Thanksgiving in 2016.[44][45]

Mashed potatoes with gravy, sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce, sweet corn, various fall vegetables, squash, and pumpkin pie are commonly associated with Thanksgiving dinner. Green bean casserole was introduced in 1955 and remains a favorite. All of these are actually native to the Americas or were introduced as a new food source to the Europeans when they arrived. Turkey may be an exception. In his book Mayflower, Nathaniel Philbrick suggests that the Pilgrims might already have been familiar with turkey in England, even though the bird is native to the Americas. The Spaniards had brought domesticated turkeys back from Central America in the early 17th century, and the birds soon became popular fare all over Europe, including England, where turkey (as an alternative to the traditional goose) became a “fixture at English Christmases”. The Pilgrims did not observe Christmas.

As a result of the size of Thanksgiving dinner, Americans eat more food on Thanksgiving than on any other day of the year.

Click here for Thanksgiving with Food Allergies.

Have a Happy Thanksgiving!

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Thanksgiving Food Allergy Tips. Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. Treating patients in Chandler, Mesa and Tempe, AZ. Phone 480-838-4296.

ThanksgivingHeader

Thanksgiving Food Allergy Tips.

Thanksgiving is a holiday in the United States notable for overindulging on a large spread of traditionally prepared foods, many of which are laced with wheat, eggs, milk and other allergenic ingredients. A perfect holiday for many Americans includes eating a butter-basted turkey, creamy mashed potatoes, traditional bread stuffing and Grandma’s pumpkin pie – followed by leaving the table stuffed, loosening one’s belt, and then falling asleep in front of a football game on the TV.Thanksgiving2

Holidays like Thanksgiving that revolve around food can truly be challenges for families raising children with food allergies. The traditional meal for your family can present numerous allergy risks — and the risks can be even greater if you are not preparing the meal yourself but relying on someone else to cook the meal. Is there any way around the stress and pressure of a holiday known for allergen-laden foods? Or can the foods be made safe for your food-allergic kids?

Additional Tips for Surviving the Holiday Season

Download KFA’s free PDF booklet, Celebrating Thanksgiving with Food Allergies to find 12 food-free Thanksgiving craft and activities, strategies for making dinner and school safe and more!

There are different approaches to this challenge, including:

  • Preparing the entire meal yourself at your home using safe ingredients.
  • Helping family prepare the meal at their homes using safe ingredients.
  • Preparing a safe meal for your child while letting the rest of your family enjoy their traditional favorites.

Your challenge is to decide what is right for your family and safe for your child.

Another approach to enjoying the holiday is to take the emphasis off food, and focus on other safe activities your whole family can enjoy together.

Don’t be afraid to try new things with your family. Play your own football game. Volunteer to serve a meal at a homeless shelter (if your kids are old enough not to eat the food, of course!). Visit a state park. Take a walk in the woods. Play a board game, or start making some Christmas presents together.

Whatever you do – eat until you can’t move, or stay away from the typical food altogether, or somewhere in between.

Have a Happy Thanksgiving!

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The origin of Thanksgiving. Featured by Allergy Associates treating allergy and asthma in Phoenix, AZ, at offices in Chandler, Tempe and Mesa, Arizona. Call 480-838-4296.

President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national Thanksgiving Day.

In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared an autumn harvest feast that is acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies. For more than two centuries, days of thanksgiving were celebrated by individual colonies and states. It wasn’t until 1863, in the midst of the Civil War, that President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national Thanksgiving Day to be held each November.

Thanksgiving at Plymouth

In September 1620, a small ship called the Mayflower left Plymouth, England, carrying 102 passengers—an assortment of religious separatists seeking a new home where they could freely practice their faith and other individuals lured by the promise of prosperity and land ownership in the New World. After a treacherous and uncomfortable crossing that lasted 66 days, they dropped anchor near the tip of Cape Cod, far north of their intended destination at the mouth of the Hudson River. One month later, the Mayflower crossed Massachusetts Bay, where the Pilgrims, as they are now commonly known, began the work of establishing a village at Plymouth.

Throughout that first brutal winter, most of the colonists remained on board the ship, where they suffered from exposure, scurvy and outbreaks of contagious disease. Only half of the Mayflower’s original passengers and crew lived to see their first New England spring. In March, the remaining settlers moved ashore, where they received an astonishing visit from an Abenaki Indian who greeted them in English. Several days later, he returned with another Native American, Squanto, a member of the Pawtuxet tribe who had been kidnapped by an English sea captain and sold into slavery before escaping to London and returning to his homeland on an exploratory expedition. Squanto taught the Pilgrims, weakened by malnutrition and illness, how to cultivate corn, extract sap from maple trees, catch fish in the rivers and avoid poisonous plants. He also helped the settlers forge an alliance with the Wampanoag, a local tribe, which would endure for more than 50 years and tragically remains one of the sole examples of harmony between European colonists and Native Americans.

View the video, “The First Thanksgiving Story”, click here >> http://goo.gl/70md7 .

In November 1621, after the Pilgrims’ first corn harvest proved successful, Governor William Bradford organized a celebratory feast and invited a group of the fledgling colony’s Native American allies, including the Wampanoag chief Massasoit. Now remembered as American’s “first Thanksgiving”—although the Pilgrims themselves may not have used the term at the time—the festival lasted for three days. While no record exists of the historic banquet’s exact menu, the Pilgrim chronicler Edward Winslow wrote in his journal that Governor Bradford sent four men on a “fowling” mission in preparation for the event, and that the Wampanoag guests arrived bearing five deer. Historians have suggested that many of the dishes were likely prepared using traditional Native American spices and cooking methods. Because the Pilgrims had no oven and the Mayflower’s sugar supply had dwindled by the fall of 1621, the meal did not feature pies, cakes or other desserts, which have become a hallmark of contemporary celebrations.

We wish you and your family a Happy Thanksgiving!

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Thanksgiving Food Allergy Tips. Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. Treating patients in Chandler, Mesa and Tempe, AZ. Phone 480-838-4296.

ThanksgivingHeader

Thanksgiving Food Allergy Tips.

Thanksgiving is a holiday in the United States notable for overindulging on a large spread of traditionally prepared foods, many of which are laced with wheat, eggs, milk and other allergenic ingredients. A perfect holiday for many Americans includes eating a butter-basted turkey, creamy mashed potatoes, traditional bread stuffing and Grandma’s pumpkin pie – followed by leaving the table stuffed, loosening one’s belt, and then falling asleep in front of a football game on the TV.Thanksgiving2

Holidays like Thanksgiving that revolve around food can truly be challenges for families raising children with food allergies. The traditional meal for your family can present numerous allergy risks — and the risks can be even greater if you are not preparing the meal yourself but relying on someone else to cook the meal. Is there any way around the stress and pressure of a holiday known for allergen-laden foods? Or can the foods be made safe for your food-allergic kids?

Additional Tips for Surviving the Holiday Season

Download KFA’s free PDF booklet, Celebrating Thanksgiving with Food Allergies to find 12 food-free Thanksgiving craft and activities, strategies for making dinner and school safe and more!

There are different approaches to this challenge, including:

  • Preparing the entire meal yourself at your home using safe ingredients.
  • Helping family prepare the meal at their homes using safe ingredients.
  • Preparing a safe meal for your child while letting the rest of your family enjoy their traditional favorites.

Your challenge is to decide what is right for your family and safe for your child.

Another approach to enjoying the holiday is to take the emphasis off food, and focus on other safe activities your whole family can enjoy together.

Don’t be afraid to try new things with your family. Play your own football game. Volunteer to serve a meal at a homeless shelter (if your kids are old enough not to eat the food, of course!). Visit a state park. Take a walk in the woods. Play a board game, or start making some Christmas presents together.

Whatever you do – eat until you can’t move, or stay away from the typical food altogether, or somewhere in between.

Have a Happy Thanksgiving!

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Allergy Associates treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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