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Practical Food Allergy Management Quick Guide for Children. Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma treating allergy and asthma in Phoenix, AZ at offices in Chandler, Tempe and Mesa, Arizona. Call 480-838-4296.

Kids-foods

Practical Food Allergy Management Quick Guide.

Posted previously on kidswithfoodallergies.org, by Michael Pistiner, MD, MMS

Prevention:

ACT to prevent an allergic reaction.Kids-Logo

AVOID:

Oral ingestion is the most common and serious form of exposure. Read labels to completely avoid even the smallest amount of the allergen. Check with your allergist for exceptions that they may recommend. Labels should be read prior to eating the food. Ingredients can change without notification. Get familiar with the current labeling laws and how they relate to your specific allergens. Avoid foods that contain advisory statements (processed in a facility, etc.) for the food allergen.

View free webinars for parents to learn about children’s food allergies, click here.

Healthy skin helps keep allergens out of our bodies; some skin exposures can cause local hives. The smell of food does not cause an allergic reaction, but breathing in cooking vapors or powdered, crushed or dust forms of an allergen has been reported by some to induce a reaction. Theses types of reactions are typically mild, but in rare cases people have reported experiencing severe reactions.

Communicate:

The child, all caregivers and anyone responsible for food preparation should know about allergy. Consider medical alert notification jewelry.

Connect with a website to purchase allergy notification wallet cards, click here.  

Teach:

Educate all caregivers who have responsibility for the child. Include children in developmentally appropriate self management skills (hand washing, allergen avoidance, saying “no thank you”. Reporting symptoms, etc.)

Prevention and preparedness should be applied to every situation – always.

Preparedness:

Be prepared to REACT.kids-girlnot eating

Recognize Anaphylaxis:

(A severe life-threatening allergic reaction): Be comfortable knowing which symptoms suggest a severe allergic reaction and when to use self-injectable epinephrine. This should be discussed with your healthcare provider. A written allergy action plan is very helpful.

A written allergy plan is very helpful in an emergency and in training others who care for your child. Ask your allergist to assist you fill out and explain the form.

Give Epinephrine:Kids-epipen

Epinephrine is the first line treatment for anaphylaxis. Always have self-injectable epinephrine available. It is wise to have two doses at hand as some people may need a second dose. Discuss this with your allergist. Practice with training devices and make sure that you are comfortable enough to not only give epinephrine if needed, but to teach other caregivers how as well.

ACTivate Emergency Response:

After treating with epinephrine, call your local ambulance service and tell them that a child is having an allergic reaction and may need more epinephrine. (An ambulance should be called not because epinephrine is dangerous, but because the allergic reaction was severe, needed to be treated with epinephrine, and may need more treatment.)

Additional resources to obtain information:

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View a video that will give you ideas for your child’s plan…


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View the entire Allergy Associates & Asthma 2-minute “Simple Guide to Allergies Series”, click here.

 

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Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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Find Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. on the internet everywhere at ‘AllergyReliefAZ’.

SUMMER – 2016 Seasonal Allergen Forecast for Chandler, Mesa, Phoenix and Tempe, AZ. Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. Phone 480-838-4296.

ForecastSeasonalAllergen

Pollen.com considers SUMMER 2016 in Tempe, Chandler & Mesa, AZ to be 

June, July and August.

The plants listed below have been documented to grow in Arizona, and to flower during the season indicated nationally. Flowering time pertains to the particular season of the year that a species is most likely to occur within your area. Although the flowering period for any particular species may be fairly extensive, the pollination period itself (which may cause allergic symptoms to those sensitive) is generally much more abbreviated.

Trees

Weeds

Grasses

View the original Pollen.com SUMMER ALLERGEN article, click here.

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Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in

Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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Find Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. on the internet everywhere at ‘AllergyReliefAZ’.

My Turn: A new state law may let people get their own tests, but there’s a potential danger in doing so. Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd at 480-838-4296.

SelfTesting

Previously posted in a “Monday My Turn” response by Dr. Miriam Anand.

Regarding the Monday My Turn by Elizabeth Holmes, founder and CEO of Theranos, about the new Arizona law that allows patients to get laboratory tests without a physician’s order.

Ms. Holmes omits an important component of ordering these tests: the physician’s level of knowledge in determining which tests are appropriate and the correct interpretation of those results.

PREVIOUSLY: Law allows do-it-yourself testing

MORE: Bill pushed by lab-testing company Theranos

Let me offer an example of who this could be detrimental to a patient’s health: testing for food allergies, for which there are a number of nuances best understood with the appropriate training.

The most important type of food allergy to know about is one that can cause anaphylaxis or a severe, potentially life threatening reaction. Let’s use peanuts as an example. When a person is allergic to peanuts, he makes a large amount of an antibody called IgE that specifically recognizes peanuts. When a peanut is eaten, the antibody attaches to the peanut protein and causes the immune system to react, resulting in an allergic reaction.

Blood tests for food allergies measure the amount of specific IgE to determine if it is high. When we have an allergic reaction to a food, however, the IgE circulating in the blood gets used up during the reaction. It can take four to six weeks for the body to make more. If you do a blood test to measure peanut-specific IgE during this time, it can be negative, even though the patient is allergic to the food.

To make matters worse, not only does our body regenerate the food specific IgE after four to six weeks, it makes more of it, which means that the next time the person eats the food, the reaction can be even more severe. If our peanut-allergic patient assumes he is not allergic based on the blood test, he may eat peanuts again and have a potentially fatal reaction.

Often, however, blood tests may be falsely positive. This means the tests show high IgE levels to foods even though the person is not allergic to these foods. I have seen a number of patients who stopped eating foods based only on the blood tests, despite never having had a known problem with that food.

The first concern is for possible nutritional deficiency depending on the foods in question. Put these results in the hands of a patient with an eating disorder, however, and you have complicated her illness and, more importantly, created further barriers to successfully treating her.

These are just two examples from my specialty where this law could cause more harm than good. I required 13 years of education and training after high school to be able to practice my specialty. I’m sure there will be examples from most other medical specialties of confusion created by this law due to the lack of training and understanding and improper interpretation of test results.

Unfortunately, contrary to what is asserted in Holmes’ column, physicians had little input in the passage of this law, in part due to the short legislative session and how fast this issue was pushed through the Legislature.

There may be certain situations where access to specific laboratory tests may be advantageous for patients without a physician visit or order, but the responsible approach to the creation of such a law would have been to consult physicians of various specialties to anticipate examples such as mine and to create medically approved information for patients to understand and interpret the tests.

Dr. Miriam Anand of Allergy Associates & Asthma, Ltd. is an allergist/immunologist.

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View original article at AZcentral.com, click here.

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View the original Pollen.com SEASONAL ALLERGEN article, click here.

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Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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A message from Dr Suresh Anand and Dr Miriam Anand with Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. Treating Phoenix area patients in Chandler, Tempe and Mesa. Phone 480-838-4296.

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Allergy Associates treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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Find Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. on the internet everywhere at ‘AllergyReliefAZ’

SUMMER – 2016 Seasonal Allergen Forecast for Chandler, Mesa, Phoenix and Tempe, AZ. Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. Phone 480-838-4296.

ForecastSeasonalAllergen

Pollen.com considers SUMMER 2016 in Tempe, Chandler & Mesa, AZ to be 

June, July and August.

The plants listed below have been documented to grow in Arizona, and to flower during the season indicated nationally. Flowering time pertains to the particular season of the year that a species is most likely to occur within your area. Although the flowering period for any particular species may be fairly extensive, the pollination period itself (which may cause allergic symptoms to those sensitive) is generally much more abbreviated.

Trees

Weeds

Grasses

View the original Pollen.com SUMMER ALLERGEN article, click here.

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Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in

Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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Find Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. on the internet everywhere at ‘AllergyReliefAZ’.

What is the Arizona Smoking law for outside a building? Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. treating allergy and asthma in Phoenix with offices in Chandler, Mesa and Tempe, Arizona. Call 480-838-4296.

 

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What is the Arizona Smoking law for outside a building?

Previously posted at Smoke Free Arizona.org website.

Let’s clear the air – inside.

In November of 2006 the citizens of Arizona made their voices heard by passing the Smoke-Free Arizona Act A.R.S. §36-601.01. This landmark
statute prohibits smoking in most enclosed public places and places of employment including (but not limited to):

  • Restaurants, bars, grocery stores, or any establishment that serves food
  • Office buildings and work areas such as meeting rooms, employee lounges, classrooms, and private offices
  • Health care facilities, hospitals, health care clinics, and doctor’s offices
  • Company-owned or employer-owned vehicles during working hours if the vehicle is occupied by more than one person
  • Enclosed common areas in hotels and motels
  • Lobbies, elevators, restrooms, reception areas, halls, stairways, and any other enclosed common-use areas in public and private buildings including condominiums and other multiple-unit residential facilities
  • Any place of employment not exempted. Click here to view exemptions.
  • Tribes are Sovereign Nations. The Smoke-Free Arizona Act has no application on Indian reservations as defined in A.R.S. §42-3301 (2).

View the Smoke Free Arizona Timeline, click here.

What about outside commercial buildings?

Smoking is allowed outdoors as long as smoking occurs at least 20 feet away from entrances, open windows, and ventilation systems of enclosed public places and places of employment where smoking is prohibited, unless defined differently by a local ordinance. This applies to all outdoor areas mentioned. Please keep in mind that a proprietor may designate the outdoor area as non-smoking. “Proprietor” means an owner, operator, manager, or other person in control of a public place or a place of employment.

This section was created to clarify the requirements of the Smoke-Free Arizona Act, A.R.S. § 36-601.01 (“the Act”), with regards to outdoor areas including outdoor patios.

Sidewalks, Walkways, Breezeways and Bus Stops

Smoking is allowed in any outdoor area unless specified differently by a local ordinance. This means that smoking is allowed on sidewalks, walkways, in breezeways, and at bus stops.

Parks

Smoking is allowed in parks; however, if you aren’t sure whether your local park or outdoor recreational area follows a stricter smoking ordinance, contact your city for more information .

Outdoor Venues

Outdoor venues may include outdoor sports stadiums, concert arenas, horse tracks, racetracks, or fairgrounds. Keep in mind that smoking is allowed outdoors as long as smoking occurs at least 20 feet away from entrances, open windows, and ventilation systems of enclosed public places or places of employment unless defined differently by a local ordinance. Outdoor venues may have their own smoking policy in addition to the Act.

Tip: Before attending an outdoor event, call the venue or check with event organizers if you need more information about their smoking policy.

Swimming Pools

Smoking around outdoor swimming pools is allowed as long as smoke is not infiltrating enclosed areas where smoking is prohibited. Enclosed areas near pools may include offices, snack bars, activity centers, clubhouses, bathrooms, or changing rooms

Swimming pools may have their own smoking policy set by the proprietor. Multi-family housing residents should follow the smoking policy set by the proprietor of their residential complex. Citizens visiting their public pool should abide by any smoking policy even if the policy is stricter than the Act. Keep in mind that Smoke-Free Arizona Program officials can only enforce the provisions defined in the Act.

Outdoor Patios and the 20 Foot Rule

Outdoor patios are one of the seven exemptions of the Law and therefore smoking is allowed on outdoor patios. If an outdoor patio is less than 20 feet from any entrances, open windows, and ventilation systems of an establishment, smoking is still allowed, but only if the proprietor uses a method that:

  • Provides a smoke-free entrance into the establishment
  • Does not permit tobacco smoke to drift into the establishment through entrances, open windows, ventilation systems, or other means

This means that if an outdoor patio of a public place or place of employment is located within 20 feet of any entrance, open window, or ventilation system, smoking is allowed anywhere on this outdoor patio as long as tobacco smoke does not enter into the enclosed area.

In order to prevent smoke from drifting into the establishment, some proprietors have chosen to use methods or a combination of methods such as, but not limited to, air curtains, physical barriers, fans, or blowers. Please keep in mind that these methods are only examples and not a requirement of the Act.

Download a FREE No Smoking SIGN, click here.

Outdoor Areas

Proprietors of public places and places of employment may implement in-house smoking policies regarding their outdoor areas.

Smoke-Free Campuses

Many proprietors of public places and places of employment in Arizona are choosing to provide smoke-free campuses for their visitors, employees, and other patrons. The Act allows proprietors to declare an entire outdoor area as a non-smoking place.

Smoke-Free Areas

Proprietors may choose to designate certain areas as smoke-free areas where smoking is prohibited. Proprietors may consider identifying these areas as non-smoking.

View the FREE video by AZ- PBS below, “The Arizona Smoke Free Act”…

Designated Smoking Areas

The Act does not require proprietors to provide designated smoking areas; however they may choose to do so. Designated smoking areas must be located at least 20 feet away from entrances, open windows, and ventilation systems. Encouraging residents, visitors, employees or other patrons to smoke in these areas is recommended.

Smoke-Free Arizona Program officials can not enforce in-house smoking policies. Those who choose not to use designated smoking areas may be in violation of the in-house smoking policy; however, they are not in violation of the Act if they are at least 20 feet away from entrances, open windows, and ventilation systems.

Download FREE “Let’s Clear the Air” brochure, click here.

Tips for Designating Outdoor Smoking Areas and Smoke-Free Areas

As a proprietor, if you choose to provide a smoke-free campus, please consider:

  • Clearly identifying the campus as smoke-free; and
  • Educating residents, visitors, employees or other patrons about your smoke-free campus policy.

As a proprietor, if you choose to provide smoke-free areas, please consider:

  • Clearly identifying the areas as non-smoking; and
  • Educating residents, visitors, employees or other patrons about where smoking is prohibited.

As a proprietor, if you choose to provide designated smoking areas, please consider:

  • Providing way finding signs for individuals looking for the designated smoking area; and
  • Educating residents, visitors, employees or other patrons about where smoking is allowed.

For more information regarding outdoor areas, call the Smoke-Free Arizona Program at 1-877-AZ STOPS (1-877-297-8677).

Download FREE business compliance CHECK LIST, click here .

Compliance

CountyHealth departments will investigate complaints about the Act. Please keep in mind that Smoke-Free Arizona Program officials can only enforce the provisions defined in the Act. This means that Smoke-Free Arizona Program officials do not enforce local ordinances or in-house smoking policies.

View the complete article and website, click here.

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Asthma Specialist Versus Primary Care: Do I Need to See an Asthma Specialist? Featured by Allergy Associates and Lab, Chandler, Mesa and Tempe AZ. 480-838-4296.

Is an Asthma/Allergy Specialist Better for My Asthma?

Previously posted by content owners Pat Bass, About.com Guide and AAFA.

Do I need to see an asthma specialist? While asthma is a common disease and commonly treated by a variety of asthma doctors, there are a number of reasons to consider seeing an asthma specialist.

What Type of Doctor Is an Asthma Specialist?

There are 2 types of physicians that are considered an asthma specialist:

If not in Phoenix, AZ, find a board certified Allergist / Immunologist, click here.

How Do I Know If I Need to See an Asthma Specialist?

You or your child should consider seeing an asthma specialist:

  • Following a life threatening asthma attack, intubation, or admission to an intensive care unit for asthma.
  • Following an asthma attack requiring hospitalization.
  • For poorly controlled asthma despite following your doctor’s instructions and taking medications appropriately after 3 to 6 months of treatment.
  • If you want an evaluation for allergy shots to help control asthma triggers.
  • If you use oral steroids to treat worsening asthma symptoms
  • If your current asthma severity is moderate persistent or worse.
  • If you or your child need additional asthma education.

If your asthma remains poorly controlled, an asthma specialist may consider other diagnoses that could be contributing to your worsening asthma such as:

Your primary care physician might also consider referring you to an asthma specialist if:

Click here for FREE ‘Causes of Asthma’ VIDEO, click here.

So Why Are Patients Not Referred to an Asthma Specialist?

While you might be surprised, many patients have not seen an asthma specialist despite meeting one or more of the previously mentioned reasons to see an asthma specialist. Why would there be so many missed opportunities for referral to an asthma specialist? Consider these reasons:

  • Your doctor does not yet think he or she needs help managing your or your child’s asthma. Sometimes doctors don’t know when to ask for help and may need a nudge from you. If you want you or your child to see an asthma specialist, you should not have any reservations about asking for a referral.
  • Your doctor may not be up to date with the latest guidelines for referral to an asthma specialist. Your primary care physician is responsible for many different guidelines for many different diseases, so it can be hard to keep up. You may proactively share the guideline with your doctor and ask if they think a referral is appropriate.
  • The health care system may be getting in the way. Sometimes there may be a number of hurdles to getting a referral. Additionally, there may not be an asthma specialist near you or you or your doctor may be trying to decrease your healthcare costs.

Does an Asthma Specialist Provide Better Asthma Care?

You will probably get different answers depending on who you ask. Importantly, it is difficult to answer this question definitively because no randomized controlled trials, the gold standard for research, have been preformed. While few differences have been seen between allergists and pulmonologists, these subspecialists did better than primary care doctors in a number of areas. However, this type of research has a number of potential biases that make it difficult to make a clear, definitive statement about this. If you meet one of the criteria previously mentioned, your asthma very well may improve by seeing a asthma specialist.

Pediatricians, general practitioners, internists, allergists and pulmonologists can all treat asthma and allergies.

Allergists or immunologists are internists and pediatricians, who have additional training in the immune system and special skills in evaluating and treating asthma and allergies.

They become board certified when they pass an examination in the specialty area of allergy and immunology. Because allergists tend to see more allergic and asthmatic people than other kinds of doctors, they are more experienced in treating them.

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This is especially important because about 90 percent of children and 50 percent of adults with asthma have allergies that trigger asthma symptoms. Identifying and learning to control these allergies can be the key to better asthma control.

Your primary care physician may refer you to an allergist to test you for allergies and to get your asthma under better control. Once your asthma and allergies are better controlled, you can expect to visit your allergist less often as he or she works with your primary care physician to keep your asthma in check.

Why it is important to locate a board certified physician near you, Click here for more information.

If you do not live in the Phoenix, Arizona area, select a board cerified and QUALIFIED allergy and asthma physician, click here.

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Allergy Associates treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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