Allergy and Asthma Treatment in Tempe, Chandler and Mesa, AZ. Phone 480-838-4296.

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Who gets Asthma and Allergies? Simple Guide to Allergies (2). Featured by Allergy Associates treating asthma and allergy in Phoenix at offices in Tempe, Chandler and Mesa, Arizona. Call 480-838-4296.

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Who gets Asthma and Allergies?

Asthma and allergies have no respect for age, gender, race or socioeconomic situations. Anyone can be affected by them at any age, bit they are most common in children. They can also reoccur after several years of being in remission. Genetic factors play a part in the development of asthma and allergies. Besides heredity, susceptible people may also have other factors working against them such as hormones, stress, smoke, perfume, or other environmental irritants [1].

Even though allergy doesn’t discriminate, there is a strong genetic component, however. Your risk of developing allergies is greater if your parents have allergies. Your risk is 60-75% if both parents have allergies, 30-50% if one parent has allergies and about 15% if neither parent has allergies.

If you have allergy, you may be allergic to more than one substance. You are more at rick for allergies if your have [2]:

  • Other family members with allergies
  • Breathing problems, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Frequent ear, respiratory, sinus or nasal infections
  • Intense and repetitive exposure to an allergen early in life
  • Past incidents of sever allergic reactions

 Watch the  FREE video below, “Understanding Allergies”…

There are no cures for allergies, they can however be well managed by you with direction from a board certified immunologist.

Hundreds of Americans die each year from allergies. The top allergic reactions causing death include penicillin, food, insects and surprisingly enough, latex rubber.

Manage you allergies with proper prevention measures and effective medical treatment. To improve your daily lifestyle and health contact the board certified physicians at Allergy Associates & Lab for professional treatment .

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View additional article on Allergies, click here >> http://goo.gl/udisW .

View additional articles on Asthma, click here >> http://goo.gl/AxQe0 .

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[1] Submitted by Suresh C. Anand, M.D., F.A.C.P., F.C.C.P., Allergy and Associates & Lab, Ltd., Tempe, Arizona (375)

[2] Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, aafa.org

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Allergy Associates treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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Common Allergens you need to know about. (5) Featured by Allergy Associates treating allergy and asthma in Phoenix, AZ at offices in Chandler, Mesa and Tempe, Arizona. Call 480-838-4296.

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The ‘Simple Guide to Allergies’ Reviews Common Allergens to Be Aware of.

You might be surprised with this information!

This article is part of a special series entitled “Simple Guide to Allergies” presented by Allergy Associates & Asthma, Ltd., Tempe, Chandler and Mesa, Arizona. Part of this information is provided by Allergy and Asthma Foundation of America (aafa.org).

Allergens can be breathed, swallowed, touched or injected (as medicine or an insect bite). If an allergen is inhaled, the allergic reaction will most likely occur in the eyes, nose and lungs. If the allergen is swallowed, symptoms often occur in the mouth, stomach or intestines. Occasionally, enough chemicals are released (from mast cells) to cause a generalized reaction throughout the body. This may result in an outbreak of hives on the skin or a sever reaction that causes a drop in blood pressure, fainting or shock. Common allergens are listed below, but there are many more too numerous to include. A person can develop an allergy to almost anything. Let’s take a quick look at the most popular allergens…

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INHALED ALLERGENS

The following substances are usually harmless when inhaled by most people, but can trigger nasal allergies, asthma or eye allergies in sensitive people.

  • Plant proteins from tree, grass and weed pollen.
  • Dust mites, cockroaches and their waste.
  • Animal proteins from pet dander (dead skin), saliva, urine of cats, dogs, birds and rodents (guinea pigs, gerbils, mice and rats).
  • Mold spores from the fungus that breaks down animal and plant matter.

SWALLOWED ALLERGENS

When the following foods or medicines are ingested, the allergy-provoking substance can enter the blood and travel to different parts of the body. Allergic reactions to food can include tongue or throat swelling, nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps or diarrhea, breathing difficulties or skin reactions.

  • Foods such as milk, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts (pecans, walnuts, almonds), soy, tomatoes, strawberries, fish and shellfish.
  • Oral drugs such as aspirin (salicylate allergy), drugs containing sulfites (sulfite allergy) and antibiotics (like penicillin).

TOUCHED ALLERGENS

This condition is caused by inflamed cells of the immune system generally in a localized area of the skin that comes in contact with the
substance. The allergy antibody lgE, hives. The skin becomes red, swollen, itchy and can develop a rash or blisters. Some allergens such as latex rubber can irate the skin or be absorbed through the skin and cause a reaction throughout the body.

  • Plants such as poison ivy, poison oak, sumac.
  • Metals such as nickel.
  • Latex rubber.
  • Chemicals (particularly fragrances and preservatives) used in cleaning products, dyes, pesticides, cosmetics and deodorants.

INJECTED ALLERGENS

When the following substances are injected into the body, they can enter the blood stream directly. A systemic reaction (occurring throughout the systems of the body) can occur if the person is allergic. In certain individuals, a life-threatening situation called anaphylactic shock can develop.

  • Insect venom such as from bee stings or fire ant bites.
  • Medications such as penicillin or sulfates.
  • Vaccines including allergy shots.
  • Hormones such as insulin.

View the entire Allergy Associates & Asthma, Ltd. 2-minute Allergy Series, click here.

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View the video below featuring Dr Miriam Anand as she discusses both indoor and outdoor allergies…

View additional article on Allergies, click here >> http://goo.gl/udisW .

View additional articles on Asthma, click here >> http://goo.gl/AxQe0

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[1] Submitted by Suresh C. Anand, M.D., F.A.C.P., F.C.C.P., Allergy and Associates & Asthma, Ltd., Tempe, Arizona (375)

[2] Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, aafa.org

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Allergy Associates treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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A message from Dr Suresh Anand and Dr Miriam Anand with Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. Treating Phoenix area patients in Chandler, Tempe and Mesa. Phone 480-838-4296.

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Why Running a Medical Practice Continues to Be Increasingly Difficult. Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. Treating asthma and allergy in Chander, Mesa and Tempe, AZ. Call 480-838-4296.

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With all of the changes occurring, medical practice continues to be increasingly difficult.

By Dr. Miriam Anand, 2014 President, Maricopa County Medical Society.

Re-posted from the Presidents April 2014 Page.

As a physician in private practice, I have a familiarity with the challenges of managing a practice that most physicians of my generation don’t, MiriamAnandWcornersbased on estimates that only approximately 33% of physicians today are in private practice. Unlike many businesses where the owner is able to focus solely on running the business, physicians in private practice are usually the primary revenue source for the practice and need to wear multiple hats. It is well known that private practice is not what it used to be and the burdens of running a practice seem to increase steadily. Medical practices are not only faced with complying with OSHA, employment law, and other obligations that face most businesses, but also with laws and regulations that are unique to medicine. The newest of these facing us in 2014 is the Affordable Care Act and the transition to ICD-10, but we are still challenged with keeping in compliance with HIPAA, the Hitech Act, Meaningful use, PQRS, and other laws and regulations that are unique to the practice of medicine. While a good practice manager should take some of the pressure off of complying with HIPAA, OSHA, labor laws, billing requirements, and the myriad of other issues that businesses, and particularly medical practices, must face, a responsible business owner must still be familiar with them.

Our business is also unique in that it is not guided by the principles of supply and demand or the free market (with the exception of aesthetic services and concierge medicine). Rather, we have to accept a set payment for services from government sponsored healthcare programs and “negotiate” rates with private insurances, all the while being at their mercy with respect to decisions to bundle services, stop coverage of certain services, relegate physicians to a non-preferred provider status, or, as has been occurring around the country recently, being dropped from the network altogether. The hoops to get paid for our services get higher and harder to jump through, while costs of increased staff and services to keep up with the bureaucracy continue to increase. One does not need an MBA to know that decreased revenue and increased costs do not make up the recipe for success.

I’ve already touched upon some of the new challenges that we will be facing in 2014 with respect to the ACA in prior articles. One such issue is PvtPracticeQuotethat patients who are signed up for health plans on the exchange programs will still be listed as eligible for coverage for 90 days after defaulting on their premium payments. I know that other businesses face the risk of theft, fraud, or non-payment from clients for other reasons, but it seems that medicine is unique in that we are now legally prevented from knowing when we will be at risk of not getting paid. It is said that this provision in the law was added to protect health insurance companies who may face a delay in payments of the subsidies from the IRS. It seems to me that this in itself is an admission of how inefficient and bureaucratic the government is and why it should have less, and not more, to do with healthcare.

Another government imposed change that we will be facing this year is the change to ICD-10 in October. In addition to requiring physicians to familiarize themselves with almost 5 times as many codes as they now use, it is now estimated that this transition could cost smaller practices up to $225,000, which is more than three times the original estimate. Unlike Meaningful Use, where there is at least an attempt to pay us back for the costs associated with implementing an EHR, we are being told to get loans or lines of credit and are pretty much on our own for funding the transition to ICD-10. On the subject of Meaningful Use, it is just one more government imposed albatross around our necks that will result in reduced payments for services for those who don’t comply, as will failure to participate in quality reporting. Add to this the looming threat of the SGR, should legislation not be passed to repeal it, and the potential for RAC and other insurance audits and the burdens facing medical practices seem to be at an all time high.

All of these create obstacles to our primary reason for going into medicine, which is to take care of patients and to provide good, quality healthcare. Rather than enhancing and streamlining our ability to provide this care to our patients, these laws and regulations take time away from it. Even at a recent meeting of my national specialty society, I found myself gravitating towards the sessions geared towards practice management in lieu of some of the scientific sessions. Furthermore, I mentioned in last month’s article that insurances are now increasing costs to patients significantly through higher premiums and/or copays. It is said that this is done so that patients will use the healthcare system more wisely. We recently saw a patient in our practice with poorly controlled asthma who has a $100.00 office visit copay. As any responsible specialist who treats asthma knows, achieving good control requires more than just one visit and involves identifying asthma triggers, prescribing the correct controller medication, educating the patient in the chronic nature of the disease and the need to comply with treatment, and following the patient periodically to assess control. A co-pay like this is more likely to deter a patient from appropriate follow up in an outpatient setting. Most of us in private practice want to provide good quality care to patients, but we must also be able to support our business. Tactics such as these to discourage patients from seeking medical care neither enhance patient care nor have a positive business impact for those in private practice. (Unfortunately, the only ones that stand to benefit in these cases are the hospitals and urgent care centers that will treat these patients emergently due to their poorly controlled chronic condition, but there are truly no winners here.)

Given the “headaches” of running a practice, it’s understandable why physicians would either want to retire early, work for someone else, go into concierge medicine, or choose alternatives to practicing medicine altogether. There are definite advantages to being in private practice, however. Practice owners have an autonomy that employed physicians aren’t always able to enjoy. They can choose to run their office in the way they feels best for them, with respect to scheduling, staffing, administration of patient care, and ambience of the office.topdocbuttonNOyear

I feel that private practitioners have another advantage over employed physicians, however. One that many might argue is an advantage to being employed. Most employed physicians do not have to be concerned with the added challenges of running a practice that I describe above. It is as if they have an extra cushion of protection between them and the effects of changing laws and regulations. This cushion may give a false sense of security, however. While it may seem that there is a bullseye on the back of the private practitioner, the reality is that our entire profession is affected and this cushion can cause some to be lulled into thinking that they are somehow protected. This likely explains why participation of employed physicians in organizations such as ours is so low. They may be aware of some of the issues, but probably assume that there is a “they” fighting against these changes. “They” are organizations like ours, however, and, as I’ve pointed out before, our strength is dependent on our numbers. “They” must become “we”, so that we can work collectively towards the best interest of medicine. The Maricopa County Medical Society continues to work hard to provide a unified voice for the physicians in our county and strives to be a resource for our members. Please encourage any employed physician that you know to become a member as our efforts also work to benefit them. As always, we welcome your comments and look forward to hearing from you.

Miriam Anand, MD

MCMS President (2014)

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View the original article at the Maricopa County Medical Society website, click here.

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Allergy Associates treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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Patient testimonials about their care at Allergy Associates. Treating asthma and allergy in Chandler, Mesa and Tempe, AZ. Call 480-838-4296.

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Below are some open public comments posted on Kudzu.com, a local Phoenix business ranking site. The Kudzu ranking criteria requires a separate evaluation for quality, service, and value; then Kudzu provides an overall ranking summary for the business as posted by the client (patient in this case).

ALLERGY ASSOCIATES & ASTHMA (LAB), Ltd. OVERALL RANKING IS 5 STARS!

 

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If you are a patient, we invite you to add your comments on the Kudzu site, click here .

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Superior Service

“I just love this place. Sad to say, its like a second home with all the allergy shots I need to get. The people are SO kind, they know me well, and they have a smile when I come in the door. I’ve always had quick service and the doctors are phenomenal. Dr. M. Anand is my allergist and she is patient, a good listener, and she always adjusts to what my needs are. I love this place and recommend it to everyone I know.”

‘LC61810’

More Information on doctor, click here .

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Best Doctor EVER!

“Dr. Suresh Anand is the BEST! I have seen him for a number of years and he has always made time for me when I was sick. He takes the time explain your options and treatments. Dr.Anand is like going to see a friend for help when you need it most!”

‘Akotarski’

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Absolutely the best!

“I’ve been a patient of this clinic for years, and the care I receive is unparalleled. Tera Crisalida PA is incredibly knowledgeable and take time to answer any questions you may have. I’m thrilled to be a patient under their care. I feel welcome & comfortable in the office, and the staff has always been lovely. This is the best group of allergists in the valley! They’ve helped me with so much- I can’t thank them enough.”

‘CupCake6’

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Vital to open airways

“I’ve been a patient of Allergy and Assoc. for over 10 years. They have helped me understand and control both asthma and allergies. They take personal interest in my well-being and treat me with respect and dignity. The entire staff is caring and concerned. I highly recommend them and often do.”

‘JanCha’

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Family Atmosphere

“You feel like family when you are there. The staff is very friendly and they provide excellent care!”

‘scFoster’

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Excellent practice

“Recommended practice for all allergy issues. Easy to talk to and can see you right away when needed.”

‘Panas4’

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Best Physicians Office in Town

“I have been going to Allergy Associates since the mid-80′s. Besides my 6 month check ups with Dr. Anand, I go in for an allergy shot every two weeks. The office is the most organized and patient-friendly I’ve ever been in. They provide outstanding service and exceptional care. The physicians never rush you and are very thorough. Dr. Anand will often take the time to explain some of my other medical conditions not related to my allergies to insure that I understand them. When I or someone in my family needs to go to another specialist, I always contact him. His office gets back to me with a few names. All of the physicians he has referred me to have been as very good doctors who take time with the patients to explain the situation at length. All of the employees in the office are very kind and efficient. They really go out of their way to help the patients navigate through complicated insurance systems.”

‘DebrohaH’

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Excellent Results

“I had allergies so severe I didn’t think I could be helped. I read Anand Suresh was one of the best in Phoenix and decided to schedule an appointment. Two years later I am virtually allergy free. I still go in for allergy shots every two weeks, but the suffering has almost entirely gone away.” Roger Cram

‘112662’

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I wish she was General Practice

“Dr. Anand is one of the best doctors I have ever seen. She is an allergy doc, but I wish she could be my primary care doctor. She is good!”

‘Gilbert_AZ’

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Featured video “Dr. Miriam Anand”…

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What is the Arizona Smoking law for outside a building? Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. treating allergy and asthma in Phoenix with offices in Chandler, Mesa and Tempe, Arizona. Call 480-838-4296.

 

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What is the Arizona Smoking law for outside a building?

Previously posted at Smoke Free Arizona.org website.

Let’s clear the air – inside.

In November of 2006 the citizens of Arizona made their voices heard by passing the Smoke-Free Arizona Act A.R.S. §36-601.01. This landmark
statute prohibits smoking in most enclosed public places and places of employment including (but not limited to):

  • Restaurants, bars, grocery stores, or any establishment that serves food
  • Office buildings and work areas such as meeting rooms, employee lounges, classrooms, and private offices
  • Health care facilities, hospitals, health care clinics, and doctor’s offices
  • Company-owned or employer-owned vehicles during working hours if the vehicle is occupied by more than one person
  • Enclosed common areas in hotels and motels
  • Lobbies, elevators, restrooms, reception areas, halls, stairways, and any other enclosed common-use areas in public and private buildings including condominiums and other multiple-unit residential facilities
  • Any place of employment not exempted. Click here to view exemptions.
  • Tribes are Sovereign Nations. The Smoke-Free Arizona Act has no application on Indian reservations as defined in A.R.S. §42-3301 (2).

View the Smoke Free Arizona Timeline, click here.

What about outside commercial buildings?

Smoking is allowed outdoors as long as smoking occurs at least 20 feet away from entrances, open windows, and ventilation systems of enclosed public places and places of employment where smoking is prohibited, unless defined differently by a local ordinance. This applies to all outdoor areas mentioned. Please keep in mind that a proprietor may designate the outdoor area as non-smoking. “Proprietor” means an owner, operator, manager, or other person in control of a public place or a place of employment.

This section was created to clarify the requirements of the Smoke-Free Arizona Act, A.R.S. § 36-601.01 (“the Act”), with regards to outdoor areas including outdoor patios.

Sidewalks, Walkways, Breezeways and Bus Stops

Smoking is allowed in any outdoor area unless specified differently by a local ordinance. This means that smoking is allowed on sidewalks, walkways, in breezeways, and at bus stops.

Parks

Smoking is allowed in parks; however, if you aren’t sure whether your local park or outdoor recreational area follows a stricter smoking ordinance, contact your city for more information .

Outdoor Venues

Outdoor venues may include outdoor sports stadiums, concert arenas, horse tracks, racetracks, or fairgrounds. Keep in mind that smoking is allowed outdoors as long as smoking occurs at least 20 feet away from entrances, open windows, and ventilation systems of enclosed public places or places of employment unless defined differently by a local ordinance. Outdoor venues may have their own smoking policy in addition to the Act.

Tip: Before attending an outdoor event, call the venue or check with event organizers if you need more information about their smoking policy.

Swimming Pools

Smoking around outdoor swimming pools is allowed as long as smoke is not infiltrating enclosed areas where smoking is prohibited. Enclosed areas near pools may include offices, snack bars, activity centers, clubhouses, bathrooms, or changing rooms

Swimming pools may have their own smoking policy set by the proprietor. Multi-family housing residents should follow the smoking policy set by the proprietor of their residential complex. Citizens visiting their public pool should abide by any smoking policy even if the policy is stricter than the Act. Keep in mind that Smoke-Free Arizona Program officials can only enforce the provisions defined in the Act.

Outdoor Patios and the 20 Foot Rule

Outdoor patios are one of the seven exemptions of the Law and therefore smoking is allowed on outdoor patios. If an outdoor patio is less than 20 feet from any entrances, open windows, and ventilation systems of an establishment, smoking is still allowed, but only if the proprietor uses a method that:

  • Provides a smoke-free entrance into the establishment
  • Does not permit tobacco smoke to drift into the establishment through entrances, open windows, ventilation systems, or other means

This means that if an outdoor patio of a public place or place of employment is located within 20 feet of any entrance, open window, or ventilation system, smoking is allowed anywhere on this outdoor patio as long as tobacco smoke does not enter into the enclosed area.

In order to prevent smoke from drifting into the establishment, some proprietors have chosen to use methods or a combination of methods such as, but not limited to, air curtains, physical barriers, fans, or blowers. Please keep in mind that these methods are only examples and not a requirement of the Act.

Download a FREE No Smoking SIGN, click here.

Outdoor Areas

Proprietors of public places and places of employment may implement in-house smoking policies regarding their outdoor areas.

Smoke-Free Campuses

Many proprietors of public places and places of employment in Arizona are choosing to provide smoke-free campuses for their visitors, employees, and other patrons. The Act allows proprietors to declare an entire outdoor area as a non-smoking place.

Smoke-Free Areas

Proprietors may choose to designate certain areas as smoke-free areas where smoking is prohibited. Proprietors may consider identifying these areas as non-smoking.

View the FREE video by AZ- PBS below, “The Arizona Smoke Free Act”…

Designated Smoking Areas

The Act does not require proprietors to provide designated smoking areas; however they may choose to do so. Designated smoking areas must be located at least 20 feet away from entrances, open windows, and ventilation systems. Encouraging residents, visitors, employees or other patrons to smoke in these areas is recommended.

Smoke-Free Arizona Program officials can not enforce in-house smoking policies. Those who choose not to use designated smoking areas may be in violation of the in-house smoking policy; however, they are not in violation of the Act if they are at least 20 feet away from entrances, open windows, and ventilation systems.

Download FREE “Let’s Clear the Air” brochure, click here.

Tips for Designating Outdoor Smoking Areas and Smoke-Free Areas

As a proprietor, if you choose to provide a smoke-free campus, please consider:

  • Clearly identifying the campus as smoke-free; and
  • Educating residents, visitors, employees or other patrons about your smoke-free campus policy.

As a proprietor, if you choose to provide smoke-free areas, please consider:

  • Clearly identifying the areas as non-smoking; and
  • Educating residents, visitors, employees or other patrons about where smoking is prohibited.

As a proprietor, if you choose to provide designated smoking areas, please consider:

  • Providing way finding signs for individuals looking for the designated smoking area; and
  • Educating residents, visitors, employees or other patrons about where smoking is allowed.

For more information regarding outdoor areas, call the Smoke-Free Arizona Program at 1-877-AZ STOPS (1-877-297-8677).

Download FREE business compliance CHECK LIST, click here .

Compliance

CountyHealth departments will investigate complaints about the Act. Please keep in mind that Smoke-Free Arizona Program officials can only enforce the provisions defined in the Act. This means that Smoke-Free Arizona Program officials do not enforce local ordinances or in-house smoking policies.

View the complete article and website, click here.

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Allergy Associates treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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Practical Food Allergy Management Quick Guide for Children. Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma treating allergy and asthma in Phoenix, AZ at offices in Chandler, Tempe and Mesa, Arizona. Call 480-838-4296.

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Practical Food Allergy Management Quick Guide.

Posted previously on kidswithfoodallergies.org, by Michael Pistiner, MD, MMS

Prevention:

ACT to prevent an allergic reaction.Kids-Logo

AVOID:

Oral ingestion is the most common and serious form of exposure. Read labels to completely avoid even the smallest amount of the allergen. Check with your allergist for exceptions that they may recommend. Labels should be read prior to eating the food. Ingredients can change without notification. Get familiar with the current labeling laws and how they relate to your specific allergens. Avoid foods that contain advisory statements (processed in a facility, etc.) for the food allergen.

View free webinars for parents to learn about children’s food allergies, click here.

Healthy skin helps keep allergens out of our bodies; some skin exposures can cause local hives. The smell of food does not cause an allergic reaction, but breathing in cooking vapors or powdered, crushed or dust forms of an allergen has been reported by some to induce a reaction. Theses types of reactions are typically mild, but in rare cases people have reported experiencing severe reactions.

Communicate:

The child, all caregivers and anyone responsible for food preparation should know about allergy. Consider medical alert notification jewelry.

Connect with a website to purchase allergy notification wallet cards, click here.  

Teach:

Educate all caregivers who have responsibility for the child. Include children in developmentally appropriate self management skills (hand washing, allergen avoidance, saying “no thank you”. Reporting symptoms, etc.)

Prevention and preparedness should be applied to every situation – always.

Preparedness:

Be prepared to REACT.kids-girlnot eating

Recognize Anaphylaxis:

(A severe life-threatening allergic reaction): Be comfortable knowing which symptoms suggest a severe allergic reaction and when to use self-injectable epinephrine. This should be discussed with your healthcare provider. A written allergy action plan is very helpful.

A written allergy plan is very helpful in an emergency and in training others who care for your child. Ask your allergist to assist you fill out and explain the form.

Give Epinephrine:Kids-epipen

Epinephrine is the first line treatment for anaphylaxis. Always have self-injectable epinephrine available. It is wise to have two doses at hand as some people may need a second dose. Discuss this with your allergist. Practice with training devices and make sure that you are comfortable enough to not only give epinephrine if needed, but to teach other caregivers how as well.

ACTivate Emergency Response:

After treating with epinephrine, call your local ambulance service and tell them that a child is having an allergic reaction and may need more epinephrine. (An ambulance should be called not because epinephrine is dangerous, but because the allergic reaction was severe, needed to be treated with epinephrine, and may need more treatment.)

Additional resources to obtain information:

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View a video that will give you ideas for your child’s plan…


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View the entire Allergy Associates & Asthma 2-minute “Simple Guide to Allergies Series”, click here.

 

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Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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