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SPRING – 2017 Seasonal Allergen Forecast for Chandler, Mesa, Phoenix and Tempe, AZ. Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. Phone 480-838-4296.

ForecastSeasonalAllergen

Pollen.com considers SPRING 2017 in Tempe, Chandler & Mesa, AZ

to be MARCH, APRIL MAY.

The plants listed below have been documented to grow in Arizona, and to flower during the season indicated nationally. Flowering time pertains to the particular season of the year that a species is most likely to occur within your area. Although the flowering period for any particular species may be fairly extensive, the pollination period itself (which may cause allergic symptoms to those sensitive) is generally much more abbreviated.

Trees

 CenterBannerLIneSolidMEDblue1.0vView the original Pollen.com SPRING ALLERGEN article, click here.

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Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. treat allergy and asthma patients in Phoenix with offices throughout the east valley in Tempe, Mesa and Chandler, AZ.

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How To Beat Spring Allergies. Featured by Allergy Associates treating allergy and asthma in Phoenix at offices in Chandler, Mesa and Tempe, AZ. Call 480-838-4296.

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Simple Guide to Allergies # 12 – ‘Tis The Season For Sneezing And Wheezing; How To Beat SRING Allergies’

This article is part of a special series entitled “Simple Guide to Allergies” presented by Allergy Associates & Asthma, Ltd., Tempe, Chandler and Mesa, Arizona.

While many eagerly await the first signs of spring, the budding trees and growing grass can mean a season of sneezing and wheezing for millions of allergy sufferers.

Spring or fall allergies, also called seasonal allergic rhinitis, affect as many as 30 percent of adults and up to 40 percent of children. Common symptoms include:

  • Sneezing
  • Stuffy or runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Itchy or watery eyes
  • Fatigue

If your asthma is triggered by allergies, you also may have symptoms of wheezing, a tight feeling in the chest, difficulty breathing or coughing. Dog2W

These symptoms are typically caused by pollen from trees and grasses and weeds.

These allergies are more than just a nuisance. They are serious diseases and should be treated that way. In fact, more than two-thirds of spring allergy sufferers actually have year-round allergies.

But there’s no reason for you to suffer. Allergy Associates & Asthma, Ltd can work with you to find out what offending allergies trigger your symptoms and discuss treatments to put the spring back into your steps. The most effective way to treat inhalant allergies is through allergy shots, also called immunotherapy. These shots slowly introduce a little bit of what you are allergic to so your body learns to tolerate it, rather than react with sneezing, wheezing, a stuffy nose or itchy eyes.

Take the Asthma or Allergy self test NOW, click here.

When and wherever possible, avoid the things that trigger your allergies.

Here are some tips:

  • Keep windows closed during pollen season, especially during the day.
  • Stay inside during mid-day and afternoon hours when pollen counts are highest.
  • Take a shower, wash hair and change clothing after working or playing outdoors.
  • Wear a mask when doing outside chores like mowing the lawn. Your allergist can help you find the type of mask that works best.

“The bottom line is that an allergist can help you improve your quality of life, by finding a board certified or trained allergist like Allergy Associates & Asthma, you can find relief.”

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Download the Newsletter Edition to view and print for future reference, click here.

View FREE asthma or allergy videos on the Allergy Associates & Asthma Ltd. channel, click here.

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View the entire Allergy Associates & Asthma, Ltd.  2-minute “Simple Guide to Allergies Series”, click here.

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A message from Dr Suresh Anand and Dr Miriam Anand with Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. Treating Phoenix area patients in Chandler, Tempe and Mesa. Phone 480-838-4296.

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My Turn: A new state law may let people get their own tests, but there’s a potential danger in doing so. Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd at 480-838-4296.

SelfTesting

Previously posted in a “Monday My Turn” response by Dr. Miriam Anand.

Regarding the Monday My Turn by Elizabeth Holmes, founder and CEO of Theranos, about the new Arizona law that allows patients to get laboratory tests without a physician’s order.

Ms. Holmes omits an important component of ordering these tests: the physician’s level of knowledge in determining which tests are appropriate and the correct interpretation of those results.

PREVIOUSLY: Law allows do-it-yourself testing

MORE: Bill pushed by lab-testing company Theranos

Let me offer an example of who this could be detrimental to a patient’s health: testing for food allergies, for which there are a number of nuances best understood with the appropriate training.

The most important type of food allergy to know about is one that can cause anaphylaxis or a severe, potentially life threatening reaction. Let’s use peanuts as an example. When a person is allergic to peanuts, he makes a large amount of an antibody called IgE that specifically recognizes peanuts. When a peanut is eaten, the antibody attaches to the peanut protein and causes the immune system to react, resulting in an allergic reaction.

Blood tests for food allergies measure the amount of specific IgE to determine if it is high. When we have an allergic reaction to a food, however, the IgE circulating in the blood gets used up during the reaction. It can take four to six weeks for the body to make more. If you do a blood test to measure peanut-specific IgE during this time, it can be negative, even though the patient is allergic to the food.

To make matters worse, not only does our body regenerate the food specific IgE after four to six weeks, it makes more of it, which means that the next time the person eats the food, the reaction can be even more severe. If our peanut-allergic patient assumes he is not allergic based on the blood test, he may eat peanuts again and have a potentially fatal reaction.

Often, however, blood tests may be falsely positive. This means the tests show high IgE levels to foods even though the person is not allergic to these foods. I have seen a number of patients who stopped eating foods based only on the blood tests, despite never having had a known problem with that food.

The first concern is for possible nutritional deficiency depending on the foods in question. Put these results in the hands of a patient with an eating disorder, however, and you have complicated her illness and, more importantly, created further barriers to successfully treating her.

These are just two examples from my specialty where this law could cause more harm than good. I required 13 years of education and training after high school to be able to practice my specialty. I’m sure there will be examples from most other medical specialties of confusion created by this law due to the lack of training and understanding and improper interpretation of test results.

Unfortunately, contrary to what is asserted in Holmes’ column, physicians had little input in the passage of this law, in part due to the short legislative session and how fast this issue was pushed through the Legislature.

There may be certain situations where access to specific laboratory tests may be advantageous for patients without a physician visit or order, but the responsible approach to the creation of such a law would have been to consult physicians of various specialties to anticipate examples such as mine and to create medically approved information for patients to understand and interpret the tests.

Dr. Miriam Anand of Allergy Associates & Asthma, Ltd. is an allergist/immunologist.

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View original article at AZcentral.com, click here.

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View the original Pollen.com SEASONAL ALLERGEN article, click here.

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Asthma Specialist Versus Primary Care: Do I Need to See an Asthma Specialist? Featured by Allergy Associates and Lab, Chandler, Mesa and Tempe AZ. 480-838-4296.

Is an Asthma/Allergy Specialist Better for My Asthma?

Previously posted by content owners Pat Bass, About.com Guide and AAFA.

Do I need to see an asthma specialist? While asthma is a common disease and commonly treated by a variety of asthma doctors, there are a number of reasons to consider seeing an asthma specialist.

What Type of Doctor Is an Asthma Specialist?

There are 2 types of physicians that are considered an asthma specialist:

If not in Phoenix, AZ, find a board certified Allergist / Immunologist, click here.

How Do I Know If I Need to See an Asthma Specialist?

You or your child should consider seeing an asthma specialist:

  • Following a life threatening asthma attack, intubation, or admission to an intensive care unit for asthma.
  • Following an asthma attack requiring hospitalization.
  • For poorly controlled asthma despite following your doctor’s instructions and taking medications appropriately after 3 to 6 months of treatment.
  • If you want an evaluation for allergy shots to help control asthma triggers.
  • If you use oral steroids to treat worsening asthma symptoms
  • If your current asthma severity is moderate persistent or worse.
  • If you or your child need additional asthma education.

If your asthma remains poorly controlled, an asthma specialist may consider other diagnoses that could be contributing to your worsening asthma such as:

Your primary care physician might also consider referring you to an asthma specialist if:

Click here for FREE ‘Causes of Asthma’ VIDEO, click here.

So Why Are Patients Not Referred to an Asthma Specialist?

While you might be surprised, many patients have not seen an asthma specialist despite meeting one or more of the previously mentioned reasons to see an asthma specialist. Why would there be so many missed opportunities for referral to an asthma specialist? Consider these reasons:

  • Your doctor does not yet think he or she needs help managing your or your child’s asthma. Sometimes doctors don’t know when to ask for help and may need a nudge from you. If you want you or your child to see an asthma specialist, you should not have any reservations about asking for a referral.
  • Your doctor may not be up to date with the latest guidelines for referral to an asthma specialist. Your primary care physician is responsible for many different guidelines for many different diseases, so it can be hard to keep up. You may proactively share the guideline with your doctor and ask if they think a referral is appropriate.
  • The health care system may be getting in the way. Sometimes there may be a number of hurdles to getting a referral. Additionally, there may not be an asthma specialist near you or you or your doctor may be trying to decrease your healthcare costs.

Does an Asthma Specialist Provide Better Asthma Care?

You will probably get different answers depending on who you ask. Importantly, it is difficult to answer this question definitively because no randomized controlled trials, the gold standard for research, have been preformed. While few differences have been seen between allergists and pulmonologists, these subspecialists did better than primary care doctors in a number of areas. However, this type of research has a number of potential biases that make it difficult to make a clear, definitive statement about this. If you meet one of the criteria previously mentioned, your asthma very well may improve by seeing a asthma specialist.

Pediatricians, general practitioners, internists, allergists and pulmonologists can all treat asthma and allergies.

Allergists or immunologists are internists and pediatricians, who have additional training in the immune system and special skills in evaluating and treating asthma and allergies.

They become board certified when they pass an examination in the specialty area of allergy and immunology. Because allergists tend to see more allergic and asthmatic people than other kinds of doctors, they are more experienced in treating them.

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This is especially important because about 90 percent of children and 50 percent of adults with asthma have allergies that trigger asthma symptoms. Identifying and learning to control these allergies can be the key to better asthma control.

Your primary care physician may refer you to an allergist to test you for allergies and to get your asthma under better control. Once your asthma and allergies are better controlled, you can expect to visit your allergist less often as he or she works with your primary care physician to keep your asthma in check.

Why it is important to locate a board certified physician near you, Click here for more information.

If you do not live in the Phoenix, Arizona area, select a board cerified and QUALIFIED allergy and asthma physician, click here.

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What you should know about Influenza for Children (Flu) SPECIAL EPIDEMIC ISSUE – Part II. Featured by Allergy Associates treating allergy and asthma in Chandler, Mesa and Tempe, AZ. Call 480-838-4296.

 

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SPECIAL EPIDEMIC ISSUE – What you should know about Influenza (Flu) for Children– Part II.Flu2-patientsick

Influenza (flu) is a viral infection. People often use the term “flu” to describe any kind of mild illness, such as a cold or a stomach virus, which has symptoms like the flu. But the real flu is different. Flu symptoms are usually worse than a cold and last longer. The flu usually does not cause vomiting or diarrhea in adults.

This flu season struck hard about a month earlier than usual in late 2012 and early 2013. But despite all those news reports about overcrowded emergency rooms, it’s too soon to say whether it will be worse than normal.

Politico.com reports, “It’s just about everywhere,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. Flu2-Politico logo“It’s a very intense transmission season — probably the most intense we’ve seen in a decade.” That means the virus spreads aggressively — but experts are still divided on whether this year’s (2012-2013) flu is especially dangerous. It’s still too early to know the full impact.

Right now, the technology allows only three strains of virus in any flu vaccine. But as soon as next year, the flu vaccine will be able to hold four strains, said Joseph Bresee, head of the CDC’s flu division.

The most similar recent flu season was 2003-04, which began even earlier than this one and was caused by a version of the strain that is dominant this year, known as the H3N2 virus.

See ‘Part I’ of this special article series , click here.

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The Vaccine Education Center of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia offers answers to commonly asked questions on Influenza, the Flu. (edited version)Flu2-CHOPlogo

Q.- Are Influenza vaccines Safe?

A. – YES. The inactivated influenza vaccine can cause pain, redness or tenderness at the site of injection. It can also cause muscle aches and low-grade fever, but because the vaccine viruses are completely inactivated, they cannot possibly cause influenza.

The Influenza vaccine does have one side effect that can be quite serious. Because it is made in eggs, the vaccine contains small quantities of egg proteins. People allergic to eggs can have a severe, and rarely fatal, allergic reaction. However, if people are allergic to eggs and are at high risk of severe Influenza infection, they should receive the vaccine under a protocol administered by a physician, such as Allergy Associates & Lab, that minimizes the allergic risk of an allergic reaction.

Q. – Does the Influenza vaccine really work?Flu2-map

A. – YES. The Influenza vaccine will prevent about 70 to 90 percent who receive it from developing moderate-to-severe Influenza infection.

Q. – When should you get the Influenza vaccine?

A. – The Influenza vaccine is given in October and November, just before Influenza season starts. The vaccine can be given throughout the season as late as March.

Q. – Who should get the Influenza vaccine?

A. – The inactivated Influenza vaccine is recommended for people at highest risk for severe complications caused by Influenza virus. Those at risk include:

  • People with chronic diseases of the lungs, heart or kidney’s
  • People with asthma
  • People older than 50
  • Pregnant women
  • Children between 6 and 23 months (the first time requires two doses for these children)

Q. – Should healthy children get the Influenza vaccine?

A. – YES. There are two reasons that ALL healthy children should receive the Influenza vaccine. First, Influenza virus can kill children. In the epidemic of 2003-2004, 152 children dies from Influenza infection; many were previously healthy and not in a high risk group. Second, people older than 65 are most likely to catch Influenza virus from young children; therefore immunizing children can also prevent deaths in the elderly.

Q. – Where can I get the Influenza vaccine?

A. – Because it is very difficult for the staff at doctor’s offices to administer a yearly, seasonal vaccine to everyone, it has become increasing important for the other sites such as pharmacies, health departments and schools to help out.

If you have asthma or allergies, contact Allergy Associates & Asthma for the best recommendation that considers your condition. Call 480-838-4296 for an appointment, or make an appointment request ONLINE, click here .

View the NPR video Flu Attack! How A Virus Invades Your Body” below…

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Keep up to date with the most current news on this year’s flu epidemic, click here.

View additional information from Vaccine Education Center at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, click here .

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View the entire Allergy Associates & Asthma 2-minute “Simple Guide to Allergies Series”, click here.

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Phoenix Flu Season. Featured by Allergy Associates and Asthma, Ltd. Treating Phoenix patients in Chandler, Mesa and Tempe, AZ. Phone 480-838-4296.

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Phoenix Flu Season.

Previously posted at azcentral.com.

Maricopa County Department of Public Health officials asked residents who think they may have the flu to visit a healthcare provider for medication but to avoid visiting overcrowded emergency rooms.

The department also sought to remind residents of the basic steps they can take to prevent spreading the flu: coughing into their sleeves, washing their hands frequently and staying at home when they are sick.

STAY HEALTHY: 7 tips for fighting the flu this season

Back to school and back to germs. This is the time cold and flu season begins to ramp up. Although the flu usually isn’t in full force until after the first of the year, now is the time to start preparing. Do you know all the things you should do to keep you and your children as cold- and flu-free as possible? Here are seven tips that will help…

1. Cough or sneeze into your elbow.

2. Wash hands often, especially after blowing your nose or coughing. Proper washing consists of using warm water and soap, and scrubbing for at least 20 seconds. Dry with a single-use towel. Tell your children to sing “Happy Birthday” twice while washing. That takes about 20 seconds.

3. Regularly disinfect the common surfaces in your home that your family touches every day, including countertops, telephones, computer keyboards, faucets and door­knobs. Viruses can survive on these surfaces for several hours, so regular cleaning is a must.

4. Make sure your family eats a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables, gets plenty of rest and exercises regularly to keep their immune systems in tip-top shape.

5. Know the difference between the cold and the flu. Flu generally comes on strong with severe symptoms, including fever, sore throat, chills, body aches, cough, runny/stuffy nose, diarrhea, vomiting, headache and fatigue. Although colds can exhibit some of the same symptoms, they usually are not as severe and often do not last as long as flu. If unsure, ask your doctor.

6. Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu shot. Children younger than 2 years old, or children with health problems like asthma, diabetes or chronic conditions of the brain, are at highest risk of severe complications of the flu and should get the flu shot. The best time to get the vaccine is October through December. There are two types of vaccinations available: the regular needle shot and the nasal vaccine. Ask your physician which is best for you and your children.

7. The best way to protect infants under 6 months old is to have the people around them vaccinated against the flu.

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